The Scottish Studies "Oor Club" is held each month at noon at the Duke of York pub in Toronto (steps from the St. George subway station). Guests are invited to give presentations on a variety of topics of interest to members of the Scottish Studies Foundation and others interested in the things that Scots in Canada and overseas are getting up to. The presentations usually lasts about an hour (pronounced "oor" in Scots), hence the name. Everyone is invited to attend as the meetings are open to all.

NEXT EVENT
Friday, March 3, 2017

"Hector's Cargo:
The Scots of Nova Scotia"
by Douglas F. Campbell

"Arrival of the Hector" painting by J.D. Kelly



Douglas F. Campbell, Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto, is the co-author with Ray MacLean of "Beyond the Atlantic Roar: A Study of the Nova Scotia Scots" (1974). He authored, co-authored and edited six more books, including "Banked Fires: The Ethnics of Nova Scotia" (1978). Campbell published twenty-four peer-reviewed articles and read thirty-five papers at professional meetings. He also did a significant amount of research on the making of The United Church of Canada founded in 1925. Campbell retired in 2000. Since retirement, Campbell has been a chauffeur to his wife taking her to her clinics -- like in the movie "Driving Ms. Daisy." His talk will focus on the Scots in four counties of Nova Scotia with an emphasis on the Scots of Pictou County.

The cost to attend Oor Club is by way of a $5 donation to the Scottish Studies Foundation. Wide selections of pub lunches are available, typically costing between $5 and $15. The gathering begins at about 11.30 am and usually ends by about 2 pm. Everyone is welcome and pleased be assured that you do not have to be Scottish to attend!

For more information you can telephone Pearl Grieve-Nixon at 416-926-7233. or you can email the Foundation at scottishstudies@yahoo.com.


The Duke of York, 39 Prince Arthur Avenue,
near the St. George subway station
(Bedford Road exit)
in the heart of downtown Toronto.



Map showing the location of the "Duke of York"